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Professional Websites at Affordable Prices - Cyberminds Ltd
Who we are?

We are a London based website design and development company.
We design, develop, deploy, host and maintain websites for our clients. Other services include Website and Email Hosting
A professionally designed website is memorable, intuitive and easy to use. Don’t let inexperienced people decide the faith of your business.
Our extensive experience expands in areas ranging from logo and web design, email marketing, e-commerce etc...
We believe that every business is unique and has its own specific needs which should be individually addressed. Stop wondering what to do next and let your business dream come true by calling us on +44(0)2033686958. Or simply send us a message by email and one of our consultants will call you back to discuss your needs. Consultation is absolutely free.

Our Services & Prices
Basic Website With Two Pages - £99
  • 2 website Pages
  • 1 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 Domain name
  • 1 year hosting
  • 2 email addresses
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 2 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Business Website Simple Package -
Was £350 Now £297.50
  • Up to 8 website Pages
  • 1 Domain name
  • 2 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses
  • Content Management System
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 6 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Simple Package -
Was £850 Now £722.50
  • Up to 10 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • logo design
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 250 MB (upgradable)
  • SSL (Shared)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 2 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Full Package -
Was £1250 Now £1062.50
  • Up to 20 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • 2 logo design
  • 1,5 year hosting
  • Up to 7 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 500 MB (upgradable)
  • 1 year SSL Certificate (dedicated)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 3 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Work we have done in the past
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What our clients say
  •   Cyberminds Ltd Have provided us with a great application that enables us to filter job applicant CVs on the fly. We are delighted as the nightmare of manually going through hundreds of CV is over. I am also impressed by the level and quality of support we received from them as we never wondered one day what to do while working with this company. .

    John Price      18/08/2010
  •   I was looking for an e-commerce website and Cyberminds have given me more than an online business. Our web site works fine and we have never had any major problem with it. The price was really good. I proudly recommend this company to anyone in need of a website. .

    Rachel Jones      4/3/2011
  •   I take this chance to thank Cyberminds for the work that has been done for my company. They have created an awesome website for me with a beautiful design. the contract was respected, they finished the job on time and the price was very attractive. I really recommend this company to anyone who needs a serious website. Thank you for your service! .

    Lord Fulama      15/7/2011
  •   As an estate agent manager, we have worked with many companies but Cyberminds Ltd have really impressed us as we soon realised that they didn't just come to us to dump a piece of software and get their money. They offered us a real business solution and were very nice people to work with. I wish many people have this lovely experience. .

    Andrew Craig      03/09/2011
 
IT News (Read all)
  • A Raspberry Pi 3 competitor will boast an SSD storage slot

    You can't put SSDs on the Raspberry Pi 3, but a competitive board coming soon will have that option.

    The new MinnowMax Turbot Dual-E board will have an m.2 slot in which SSDs can be inserted. It's being made by ADI Engineering and will be released in the third quarter, according to a message on Twitter.

    The board's price wasn't immediately available.

    High-capacity SSD chips with up to 512GB can be found on sites like NewEgg. But the MinnowMax board's SSD storage capacity will ultimately depend on the device's hardware specifications.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • How to make IT governance work

    Business executives are able to hold two contradictory thoughts in their heads: Technology is costly, but the internal IT services they use are free. An IT governance process is the way to get those execs to understand IT’s true costs — and opportunities.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    (Insider Story)IT News
  • The EU and U.S. reach data-transfer deal, report says

    The U.S. and the European Union have reportedly reached an agreement on the language of a key data transfer pact, including limits on U.S. surveillance.

    The revamped EU-U.S. Privacy Shield was sent to EU member states overnight, according to a report from Reuters. Privacy Shield would govern how multinational companies handle the private data of EU residents.

    Member states are expected to vote on the proposal in July, unnamed sources told Reuters. Representatives of the EU and the U.S. Department of Commerce didn't immediately respond to requests for comments on the reported deal.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Bitnami's growth an indicator of continuing cloud dominance

    I've written about Bitnami many times in the past. It's CEO, Erica Brescia, is one of a (sadly) small number of tech startup founders who happen to be women. And, while that makes a great headline or discussion point, it's Bitnami's success, outside of any gender-specific focus that really interests me.

    Bitnami builds marketplaces that allow cloud vendors to offer the end-user application on top of their clouds. Bitnami is an application store for open source applications -- for end users, what this means is that on the cloud platforms that Bitnami is integrated with, they can deploy the open source application or development environment they want quickly and easily -- fully configured and ready to run.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Lenovo patches two high-severity flaws in PC support tool

    Lenovo has fixed two high-severity vulnerabilities in the Lenovo Solution Center support tool that is preinstalled on many laptop and desktop PCs. The flaws could allow attackers to take over computers and terminate antivirus processes.

    Lenovo Solution Center (LSC) allows users to check their system's virus and firewall status, update their Lenovo software, perform backups, check battery health, get registration and warranty information and run hardware tests.

    The two new vulnerabilities, tracked as CVE-2016-5249 and CVE-2016-5248 in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures database, were found by security researchers from Trustwave. They affect LSC versions 3.3.002 and earlier.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Brexit: This is what it means for Tech
    IT News
  • 54% off Vansky Bias Lighting for HDTV USB LED Multi Color Strip Accent Lighting - Deal Alert

    This bias lighting strip, currently discounted by 54% on Amazon from $49.99 down to just $22.99, reduces eye-strain caused by differences in picture brightness from scene to scene in movies, shows and games, by adding a subtle backlight to your monitor or TV.  The LED lights can be changed with up to 20 color selections customizing and setting the mood of your workspace. The strip is easy to install and can be cut to size and plugs directly in the USB port of the TV or monitor.  Just Plug-and-play!

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Review: The Plantronics Voyager 5200 -- a Bluetooth headset for business class

    If your ear is attached to your phone during much of the workday, you are in the market for a serious headset such as Plantronics' new Voyager 5200. The latest in the Voyager series of mobile headsets, the look of the 5200 isn't subtle -- when you're wearing it, you (and everyone else) will know you're got a headset on. But that is unimportant compared to its many features, comfortable fit and excellent sound quality. It is currently selling for $120 (vendor price).

    Most consumer headsets today tend to minimize the number of hardware controls in order to keep the headset small and lightweight. The Voyager 5200 bucks that trend; it's got all the controls you'd want in a reasonably sized 0.71-oz. unit.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • The essential guide to using Siri on a Sierra Mac

    Scheduled to ship in Fall with a public beta next month, macOS Sierra brings numerous improvements, with Siri making its debut on the Mac. In this report I’ll explain what you need to know to use Siri with your Mac.

    [Also Read: First look: A week with macOS Sierra]

    Enabling Siri

    You’ll be asked to enable Siri when you install macOS Sierra, however, if you don’t do it then, don’t worry as Siri can also be enabled in System Preferences where it has its own “Siri” section. To the left of the Preferences pane you currently see the “Enable Siri” checkbox, which should be enabled by default. To the right you find preferences including language, voice, voice feedback, Mic Input and a drop down menu with which to enable a Keyboard Shortcut (see below). You will also find a tick box to show Siri in the menu bar and a link to take you to Apple’s Siri privacy pages.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Why the U.K.'s vote to leave the EU will have little effect on its data protection rules

    With the haircut that the sterling-euro exchange rate has taken in the wake of the U.K.'s vote to leave the European Union, the U.K. has suddenly become a low-cost country for companies wishing to host or process the personal information of EU citizens.

    As for U.K. businesses hoping for more relaxed data protection rules in the wake of the referendum vote, they will have to wait -- perhaps for a very long while.

    That's because many of the rules that the 51.9 percent who voted to leave the EU hoped to escape are, in fact, firmly part of U.K. law, and will only go away if the U.K. Parliament votes to repeal them.

    And it can't do that until it has negotiated its exit from the EU, which is a matter of international treaty and not the will of the people.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Target learns that customized offers need to be in your face

    Every channel is its own island, with its own strengths and weaknesses. The temptation is to try and make every island universal. Target this week learned that sometimes less is more.

    Its Cartwheel coupon app, which had shown users all of the standard offers, now can present offers customized for each shopper. It's in-your-face customization.

    "The beloved couponing app just got its biggest redesign and overhaul since launching three years ago," Target said in its announcement. "Open the app, and you’ll immediately see 'For You' — our personalized offer recommendations — to get you inspired and excited about your trip through our aisles."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • DARPA is looking to make huge strides in machine learning

    The U.S. Defense Department's research and development arm is offering to fund projects that will simplify the massively complex task of building models for machine learning applications.

    Models are a fundamental part of machine learning. Similar to algorithms, they help teach computers to, say, identify a cat in a photo, forecast weather from historical data or sort spam from legitimate email.

    But writing the models takes time and requires many skills. Typically, data scientists, subject matter experts and software engineers all have to come together to develop the model.

    When New York University researchers wanted to model block-by-block traffic flow data for the city, it took 60 person-months of work by data scientists to prepare the data for use and an additional 30 person-months to develop the model.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Seagate targets storage for drones and robots

    Seagate is targeting drones and robots as it looks to add its storage technologies to new devices.

    "There's a huge opportunity there," said Patrick Ferguson, a product manager at Seagate. "I'm really excited about it."

    Robots and drones generate a lot of data, but have limited internal storage to retain all that information. For example, drones with multiple cameras generate a lot of video, but just one CompactFlash or SD card to store all that data may not be enough.

    "In a 20 minute flight you're talking hundreds of gigabytes, not tens of gigabytes," Ferguson said.

    Data increasingly is being uploaded to the cloud for analysis. Gigabytes of data can't be uploaded to the cloud in real-time when a drone's in flight, so it'll have to sit on the device until it can be extracted and uploaded.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • U.S. court rules that FBI can hack into a computer without a warrant

    A U.S. court has ruled that the FBI can hack into a computer without a warrant -- a move that is troubling privacy advocates.

    The criminal case involves a child pornography site, Playpen, that had been accessible through Tor, a browser designed for anonymous web surfing.

    The FBI, however, managed to take over the site in 2014, and then tracked down and arrested its members by hacking their computers. This allowed law enforcement to secretly collect their IP addresses.

    One of the arrested suspects has argued that the evidence against him had been unlawfully seized. But a  U.S. court in Virginia has ruled in favor of the FBI, according to court documents unsealed on Thursday.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Apple discontinuing Thunderbolt Display

    Apple is discontinuing its Thunderbolt Display, the high-resolution external display that users of the MacBook and other Macs could use to get a better picture and work with more apps.

    The company said Thursday that the 27-inch widescreen display with LED backlight technology will be available on Apple’s online store, in Apple retail stores and from authorized resellers while supplies last.

    The Thunderbolt Display currently retails on the Apple online store at $999. It has a 2560 x 1440 resolution.

    It isn’t clear whether Apple plans to follow with newer versions that use 5K resolution displays at 5120 by 2880 pixels, which is the display technology Apple uses on its high-end iMac. There was speculation earlier that a new version would be announced at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference this month.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Keep your aging Mac up to speed

    We are living in some interesting and exciting times in regards to technology.

    It always seems to be the case though, even when you think back to around a decade ago when Apple was transitioning to Intel processors for Macs and that new gadget, the iPhone, was on the horizon. Looking back from where we are today makes those strides seem a little mild, but they were huge steps that paved the road to the hardware, software and services we are enjoying today.

    Keeping up or falling behind?

    Surprisingly, there are still so many users, both consumer and business alike, that have been reluctant to move forward. This "don't fix it if it isn't broke" mentality had turned out to be more problematic than expected for many.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • It's just the job for you!

    This database developer pilot fish has spent four well-paid years under contract to a data marketing company, and he's very well liked by his fellow developers -- though not so much by some members of management.

    "The director was miffed that I was making more money than he was," says fish. "But every time he tried to terminate my contract, the VP or some other bigwig would reinstate it after hearing from the other developers how valuable my technical knowledge was to them. I freely share my wealth and breadth of knowledge because I believe everybody should be the guru, so I don't have to be the only one."

    But eventually a round of management politics does get fish's contract terminated, and soon after he spots a job-board posting for a highly skilled Oracle database developer -- "someone who will be the go-to guy for the entire department" -- that makes it sound like fish is exactly who the would-be employer is looking for.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Review: The Starry Station Wi-Fi router sticks with simplicity (+video)

    If you've reviewed tech products for as long as I have, you'll have learned that categories of products have archetypes. These days, for example, laptops are (for the most part) slim black boxes and monitors are thin glass rectangles. Mobile phones, which used to have clamshell designs, are now all metal (or metal-looking) slabs with a glass front. And home wireless routers tend to be small black boxes bristling with more antennas than an NSA surveillance van.

    The Starry Station wireless router breaks the mold. A white polycarbonate-over-metal triangular prism with a base measuring 7 x 3 in. and standing 6.25 in. high, it has a 3.8-in. LCD touchscreen you can use to see and control the device's operational status. The device retails for $350 (Amazon price - What's this?).

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Lessons and observations from the GoToMyPC incident

    There are two approaches for remotely controlling a computer, calling out and dialing in.

    RealVNC and Microsoft's Remote Desktop are examples of the dialing in approach. When the server side of RealVNC is installed on a computer, it waits for an incoming connection. If the computer is behind a firewall, a hole needs to be punched in the firewall to allow this incoming connection.

    People not wanting to deal with firewalls and port forwarding, can chose software, such as GoToMyPC that, like ET, phones home. This takes advantage of the fact that firewalls, as a rule, let anything out.

    When the server side of GoToMyPC software is installed on a computer, it phones home to Citrix and maintains that connection at all times. A GoToMyPC customer, wanting to remotely control a computer, contacts Citrix, the company behind GoToMyPC. Citrix serves as a man in the middle and makes the connection between the two computers.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Boston Dynamics' four-legged robot climbs stairs, slips on a banana skin

    Boston Dynamics, the Google-owned robot maker that's apparently up for sale, has a new four-legged robot small enough to walk around a house, agile enough to load your dishwasher, and not quite clever enough to avoid banana skins on the floor.

    Called Spot Mini, it's a smaller version of the company's Spot robot. Spot was developed for use by the U.S. military and took part in tests with Marines last year.

    In a video posted to YouTube on Thursday, Spot Mini is seen in several configurations. In one it has a prominent LIDAR laser imaging sensor on top of its body and in another is an arm with a gripper on the end.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Why Russian hackers were likely behind the DNC breach

    Proving who pulled off a cyber attack is never easy and sometimes impossible. That’s the reality investigators face as they try to figure out who breached the network of the Democratic National Committee, which revealed last week that hackers had made off with confidential documents including research on Republican presidential opponent Donald Trump.

    Russia was fingered as the likely suspect, until a hacker calling himself Guccifer 2.0 stepped up and claimed that he acted alone. But despite what appear to be DNC documents posted by Guccifer online, some security experts remain convinced that a group of skilled Russian hackers was behind the attack - likely acting on behalf of the Russian government. Here's why they think that:

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Google and Tesla self-driving tech comes under scrutiny, presents moral dilemma

    Autonomous cars are in the news again, this time about new research into the moral implications of what happens in an accident.

    In several interesting examples, researchers posed questions about what happens when there is a choice between two evils.

    In one example, there are three choices. The robotic car has to decide between killing one passerby but not a crowd or the driver, killing people in the crowd, or killing the driver only. That’s a horrific situation and reminds me of what happened in Las Vegas when a human driver killed several people in a crowd (but lived herself).

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Oracle will give cloud users first dibs on its next big database update

    Oracle's namesake database may have been born on-premises, but the next big update to the software will make its debut in the cloud.

    Oracle Database 12c Release 2, also known as Oracle Database 12.2, is slated for release in the second half of this year. It will first be made available in the cloud, with an on-premises version arriving at some undefined point in the future.

    “We are committed to giving customers more options to move to the cloud because it helps them reduce costs and become more efficient and agile," Oracle said in a statement sent by email. "Oracle Database 12.2 will be available in the cloud first, but we will also make it accessible to all of our customers.”

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Microsoft: Government's data gag order practices worse than first thought

    Microsoft has significantly upped the tally of U.S. government gag orders slapped on demands for customer information, according to court documents filed last week.

    In a revised complaint submitted to a Seattle federal court last Friday, Microsoft said that more than half of all government data demands were bound by a secrecy order that prevented the company from telling customers of its cloud-based services that authorities had asked it to hand over their information.

    The original complaint -- the first round in a lawsuit Microsoft filed in April against the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and Attorney General Loretta Lynch -- had pegged the number of data demands during the past 18 months at 5,624. Of those, 2,576, or 46%, were tagged with secrecy orders that prevented Microsoft from telling customers it had been compelled to give up their information.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • GozNym Trojan targets business accounts at major U.S. banks

    A hybrid Trojan program created for financial fraud has started redirecting users of four large U.S. banks to rogue websites in order to hijack their accounts.

    GozNym is a relatively new threat, first discovered in April, and is based on the Nymaim malware dropper and the Gozi banking Trojan. Like most banking Trojans, GozNym can inject rogue code into banking websites displayed in local browsers to steal credentials and other sensitive information.

    However, in addition to this old technique, the cybercrime gang behind it has also built the necessary infrastructure to host rogue copies of banking websites, and they've started to redirect victims there.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Battle lines are drawn: IBM prepares Power9 to take on Intel and ARM

    IBM has many goals with its upcoming Power9 chip, and one of them is to challenge the dominance of Intel's x86 chips in the data center.

    The company wants chips based on Power architecture to take a double-digit server chip market share by 2020, Doug Balog, general manager for Power Systems at IBM, said in an interview.

    It'll be a three-way battle between x86, Power and ARM, which has a similar goal of a double-digit market share in the next four years. IBM's Power is off to a better start in terms of socket share, Balog said. IBM already is being used in servers, while ARM server processors are largely still being tested.

    Intel dominates the data center server chip market with a 90-plus percent market share. But IDC has predicted that Intel's share will shrink as ARM-based chips and AMD's x86-based Zen take away some of that lead.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Facebook takes on critics with political bias class

    After facing allegations that it was actively suppressing conservative views, Facebook has responded by adding an employee training class focused on political bias.

    Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg announced the addition of the political bias class to the company's ongoing course on Managing Unconscious Bias during a talk she gave at the American Enterprise Institute, according to The Daily Signal.

    "We have a managing bias class that all of our leaders and a lot of our employees have taken that I was part of helping to create," Sandberg said. "And we focused on racial bias, age bias, gender bias, national bias, and we're going to add in a scenario now on political bias.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • How I Use Android: Franco.Kernel and Focus creator Francisco Franco

    These days, most Android devices work pretty well out of the box -- but that doesn't mean you can't get under the hood and do some serious tinkering if your inner geek demands it.

    From the get-go, Android's been a virtual playground for power users, with a fully accessible file system and the ability to take complete control over a device. Just like other Linux-based operating systems, Android allows you to gain root access and do some insanely advanced customizations (assuming, of course, you know what you're doing and don't mind taking the associated risks; remember, that which is prodded can easily be punctured).

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • AWS and Azure clouds gain security OK from feds

    Three vendors, including Microsoft and Amazon Web Services, have won a key U.S. government authorization that allows federal agencies to put highly sensitive data on their cloud-computing services.

    The AWS GovCloud, Microsoft's Azure GovCloud, and CSRA's ARC-P IaaS have received provisional authority to offer services under the high baseline of the government's Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP), a set of security standards for cloud services.

    The FedRAMP high baseline, including more than 400 security controls, allows federal agencies to use AWS for highly sensitive workloads, including personal information, AWS said Thursday.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • BlackBerry goes into the red as revenue drops by a third

    It looks as though BlackBerry CEO John Chen will be in charge long enough to launch another couple of phones -- although don't expect any new flagship models.

    Chen was re-elected board chairman for another year on Wednesday.

    He still plans to launch two new mid-range phones in the next nine months, one of them as early as July. They'll be cheaper than the Priv, BlackBerry's first Android phone, but with the same level of security, he said Thursday.

    Shareholders might not have given him such strong support if they'd seen the numbers the company reported Thursday for the first quarter of its 2017 financial year.

    Revenue dropped to $400 million in the three months to May 31, down 39 percent from $658 million a year earlier.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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