Professional websites at affordable prices.

 +44(0)2033686958
Professional Websites at Affordable Prices - Cyberminds Ltd
Who we are?

We are a London based website design and development company.
We design, develop, deploy, host and maintain websites for our clients. Other services include Website and Email Hosting
A professionally designed website is memorable, intuitive and easy to use. Don’t let inexperienced people decide the faith of your business.
Our extensive experience expands in areas ranging from logo and web design, email marketing, e-commerce etc...
We believe that every business is unique and has its own specific needs which should be individually addressed. Stop wondering what to do next and let your business dream come true by calling us on +44(0)2033686958. Or simply send us a message by email and one of our consultants will call you back to discuss your needs. Consultation is absolutely free.

Our Services & Prices
Basic Website With Two Pages - £99
  • 2 website Pages
  • 1 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 Domain name
  • 1 year hosting
  • 2 email addresses
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 2 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Business Website Simple Package -
Was £350 Now £297.50
  • Up to 8 website Pages
  • 1 Domain name
  • 2 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses
  • Content Management System
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 6 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Simple Package -
Was £850 Now £722.50
  • Up to 10 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • logo design
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 250 MB (upgradable)
  • SSL (Shared)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 2 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Full Package -
Was £1250 Now £1062.50
  • Up to 20 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • 2 logo design
  • 1,5 year hosting
  • Up to 7 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 500 MB (upgradable)
  • 1 year SSL Certificate (dedicated)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 3 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Work we have done in the past
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What our clients say
  •   Cyberminds Ltd Have provided us with a great application that enables us to filter job applicant CVs on the fly. We are delighted as the nightmare of manually going through hundreds of CV is over. I am also impressed by the level and quality of support we received from them as we never wondered one day what to do while working with this company. .

    John Price      18/08/2010
  •   I was looking for an e-commerce website and Cyberminds have given me more than an online business. Our web site works fine and we have never had any major problem with it. The price was really good. I proudly recommend this company to anyone in need of a website. .

    Rachel Jones      4/3/2011
  •   I take this chance to thank Cyberminds for the work that has been done for my company. They have created an awesome website for me with a beautiful design. the contract was respected, they finished the job on time and the price was very attractive. I really recommend this company to anyone who needs a serious website. Thank you for your service! .

    Lord Fulama      15/7/2011
  •   As an estate agent manager, we have worked with many companies but Cyberminds Ltd have really impressed us as we soon realised that they didn't just come to us to dump a piece of software and get their money. They offered us a real business solution and were very nice people to work with. I wish many people have this lovely experience. .

    Andrew Craig      03/09/2011
 
IT News (Read all)
  • Microsoft to business: Don't worry about Windows 10, consumers will test it

    Microsoft on Friday said consumers would become coal mine canaries who turn up bugs and problems in each Windows 10 update months before businesses have to commit to the fixes.

    In a blog post that outlined enterprise options for deploying Windows 10's faster update tempo, Microsoft formalized what has been a long-standing practice by savvy customers: wait to accept an update until unwitting others shake out the bugs and Microsoft fixes them.

    "By putting devices on the Current branch for Business, enterprises will be able to receive feature updates after their quality and application compatibility has been assessed in the consumer market, while continuing to receive security updates on a regular basis," wrote Jim Alkove, director of program management for Microsoft's enterprise group, in the Jan. 30 post.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 7 smartphone rules changed this week

    Federal regulators have been throwing their weight around lately, and mostly to good effect for consumers and users of mobile technology.

    The net effect of their recent activism adds up to a whole new set of rules and protections for all of us.

    Here are the ramifications of seven new rules.

    1. Carriers can't throttle 'unlimited" data plans anymore.

    The Federal Trade Commission ordered prepaid mobile provider TracFone to pay a fine of $40 million. The transgression? It throttled (deliberately slowed down) the data connectivity of customers who had been sold "unlimited" data plans.

    Mobile data providers like AT&T and others often used to have it both ways: They charged high fees for "unlimited" plans, whose performance slowed to a crawl once the user reached a specific monthly amount of data.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Google Now adds data from Lyft, Airbnb and other apps

    Google Now just got a lot smarter, adding data from dozens of outside apps to help people get more things done as they go about their day.

    Google Now is a search tool and digital assistant built into Android devices and the Chrome browser, and included as part of the Google search app for iOS. Until now it's served up information about the weather, restaurant reservations, shipping notifications and nearby events based on people's past Google searches and reading their Gmail messages. The content is presented as "cards" that users can swipe through and dismiss as they please. The idea is to present helpful information, sometimes before people know they need it.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • MIT randomizes tasks to speed up massive multicore processors

    As each new generation of computer processors arrives with a larger number of computing cores, computer scientists grapple with how best to make use of this proliferation of parallel power.

    Now researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a data structure that they claim can help large multicore processors churn through their workloads more effectively. Their trick? Do away with the traditional first-come, first-served work queue and assign tasks more randomly.

    MIT's new SprayList algorithm allows processors with many cores to spread out their work so they don't stumble over one another, creating bottlenecks that hamper performance.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • NEC aims at Big Data 'sweet spot' with SAP Hana tool

    Cloud computing and SAP's Hana in-memory database can be a powerful combination for data analysis, and new tools could help to make sure it doesn't fall down on the job.

    On Friday, NEC released a tool designed to make life easier for data analysts by boosting Hana availability in the cloud.

    Focusing in particular on users of the Amazon Web Services cloud, the new tool takes advantage of NEC's ExpressCluster software. The tool can automatically detect system faults as SAP Hana runs on AWS and switch over to a standby server when problems arise. The result, NEC said, is to shorten downtime and improve both availability and operational efficiency.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Uber will fight to keep Boston ride data private

    Earlier this month, Uber agreed to provide Boston city officials a wealth of ride data to help them make better planning decisions -- but it will go to considerable lengths to ensure that data is not made public.

    The data, which includes anonymous pick-off and drop-off locations for each Uber ride, contains confidential commercial and financial information that prohibits the city from sharing it publicly, according to Uber's agreement with the city.

    While citizens are often entitled access to public records, Uber and the city agreed that the data it provided contains trade secrets, which making it exempt from public disclosure under a section of Massachusetts Public Records Law.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Verizon to allow opt-out from mobile 'supercookies'

    Verizon will soon allow customers to opt out of having an identifier placed on their phones that had alarmed privacy advocates due to its ability to let third parties persistently track customers.

    The identifier or customer code drew concerns primarily because it created so-called "supercookies" that could not be deleted by users. Verizon customers have had the ability to opt out of the company's advertising programs, but not out of having that identifier placed on their devices.

    Now, "we have begun working to expand the opt-out to include the identifier referred to as the UIDH [unique identifier header], and expect that to be available soon," a Verizon spokeswoman said Friday via email. She added that "Verizon never shares customer information with third parties as part of our advertising program."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • AT&T to pay $18.2B as top bidder in mobile spectrum auction

    AT&T spent nearly $18.2 billion on wireless spectrum licenses in a blockbuster mobile-auction spectrum for licenses across the U.S., far outspending the other major U.S. carriers and satellite service provider Dish Network.

    The AWS-3 auction, the biggest sale of mobile spectrum since 2008, went on for about two and a half months and brought in a far higher total than expected.

    The auction raised $41.3 billion in net bids, which will go toward the FirstNet national public-safety network and some national debt reduction. The bidding on 1,611 spectrum licenses around the U.S. far exceeded expectations, indicating that mobile operators are still eager to build up capacity in their networks.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Facebook tests delivering tips about your location

    Facebook is getting closer to territory occupied by Yelp and Foursquare by testing a new service that will provide users with recommendations about their locations.

    Starting Thursday, some users of Facebook on iPhone in New York will find a new feature, called "Place Tips," at the top of their news feed, which will surface information on their locations, as well as posts and photos of the place that friends have shared.

    "You can also see information about the place, including posts from its Page, popular menu items and upcoming events," wrote Mike LeBeau, Facebook product manager in a blog post.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Google Glass holds promise but requires a 'reset'

    Google Glass failed to meet goals set by the search giant, causing the company to halt the program and rethink its strategy for the wearable device.

    That candid assessment was made by Google Chief Financial Officer Patrick Pichette during the company's 2014 fourth-quarter earnings call on Thursday.

    All projects must reach predetermined goals in order for Google to provide additional capital, Pichette said. Projects that fail to meet those marks but have the potential for success, like Glass, are suspended and reworked.

    "When the teams aren't able to hit hurdles, but we think there [is] still a lot of promise, we might ask them to take a pause and take the time to reset their strategies, as we recently did in the case of Glass," Pichette said.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Orchestrating the Super Bowl

    Since we are right on the heels of the Super Bowl, it's a great time to share how NFL is orchestrating technology specifically for the biggest game of the season.

    I’ve been to two NFL stadiums since Extreme Networks has become the official Wi-Fi provider of the NFL and let me tell you ---that orchestration isn’t easy.

    The highlight and orchestration of sports and technology is intriguing to me. Why–you ask? Many times we are so focused on one area (in my case government) that it is good to step outside of your circle and listen to what others are doing. It is the idea that being a true technologist means transcending your certain title or industry, and being able to look across for ideas that relate.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • DARPA teaches robots to cook by watching YouTube

    The Pentagon's most advanced tech-development wing has succeeded in developing a mathematical language so advanced it could allow robots to learn by watching YouTube videos.

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) issued a series of grants in 2011 to fund research into ways to create a mathematical language that would allow the military to combine data from drone video, cell-phone intercepts, targeting radar and any other available method of sensing the outside world into a single stream of data, but that was only the initial goal.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Brief: Tesla boosts 0-60 acceleration with over-the-air software upgrade

    Tesla's dual motor Model S P85D is a sedan that can already go from 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds - faster than a Ferrari Enzo or a Ford Mustang Shelby GT500.

    Overnight, Model S Teslas around the world got a little faster.

    Tesla performed a wireless software upgrade to the car, improving its 0-60 mph speed by about one-tenth (0.1) of a second.

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted about the upgrade, saying it was an update to the inverter algorithm. An inverter, invented by Nikola Tesla more than 100 years ago, changes direct current electricity to alternating current.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Microsoft updates cloud-based SQL Server to ease management

    Microsoft has added automated backup and patching for SQL Server databases running in virtual machines on its Azure cloud, in a bid to simplify management and improve reliability.

    As enterprises move more and larger IT systems to the cloud, advanced management functionality is becoming increasingly important to keep systems up and costs down. And step by step, service providers like Amazon Web Services and Microsoft are adding new features to streamline management processes.

    The latest improvements from Microsoft are aimed at keeping SQL Server backed up and secure in a more convenient way when running the database in virtual machines on Azure.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Test shows big data text analysis inconsistent, inaccurate

    Big data analytic systems are reputed to be capable of finding a needle in a universe of haystacks without having to know what a needle looks like.

    Even the simplest part of that process – sorting all the data available into Haystacks and Not Haystacks so the analytics can at least work with data that is relevant – requires a topical analysis that uses the metadata accompanying each giant pile of data to classify each bit according to topic as well as source, format and other criteria.

    The very best ways to sort large databases of unstructured text is to use a technique called Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) – a modeling technique that identifies text within documents as belonging to a limited number of still-unknown topics, groups them according to how likely it is that they refer to the same topic, then backtracks to identify what those topics actually are. (Here's the full explanation in the Journal of Machine Learning Research; here's Wikipedia's. )

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • The ZeroAccess botnet is back in business

    A peer-to-peer botnet called ZeroAccess came out of a six-month hibernation this month after having survived two takedown attempts by law enforcement and security researchers.

    At its peak in 2013, ZeroAccess, also known as Sirefef, consisted of more than 1.9 million infected computers that were primarily used for click fraud and Bitcoin mining.

    That was until security researchers from Symantec found a flaw in the botnet's resilient peer-to-peer architecture. This architecture allowed the bots to exchange files, instructions and information with each other without the need for central command-and-control servers, which are the Achilles' heel of most botnets.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Intuit backpedals from TurboTax changes after upgrade uproar

    Intuit backtracked yesterday, not only again apologizing for stiffing TurboTax customers by not telling them of changes in its business model but saying that it would offer partial refunds and free upgrades to its more capable editions.

    "These past couple of weeks have not been our finest hour," admitted Intuit's CEO Brad Smith in a video posted on his LinkedIn account Thursday. "We're taking new steps to make things right."

    The fiasco over TurboTax -- what tax forms it supported in its Q&A-like interview process -- harked back to early January, when Consumerworld.org revealed that the desktop edition of TurboTax Deluxe omitted sections for forms required by the self-employed, investors and rental property owners. After buying Deluxe, as they had for years, users were told mid-way through the tax preparation process that they needed to pay more and do an in-place upgrade to deal with Schedules C, D and E.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Now on CIO: 5 affordable hardware upgrades
    Jazz up your system's storage, memory, networking and display without breaking the bank with this desktop PC upgrade guide.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Apple ships iTunes 12.1: What you need to know

    Apple has introduced iTunes 12.1, bringing a handy Notifications Center widget and some slight additional improvements to the software.

    The Notifications widget

    The widget lives in the Today view inside Notifications. To activate it just click on the “Edit” button at the bottom of Notifications view and tap the “+” button beside the widget name in the list on the right.

    It is basically a stripped down version of the already stripped down functionality you find in the MiniPlayer, without album art, volume control or track listings. But it's pretty useful all the same.

    Once active, it'll show you the music (or other media) that’s currently playing on iTunes or iTunes radio in Notifications view. You now have three ways to check this: through iTunes, via the iTunes Miniplayer and via the new “Now Playing” Notifications widget.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Ghost flaw in Linux can be exploited through WordPress, other PHP apps

    A critical vulnerability in glibc, a core Linux library, can be exploited remotely through WordPress and likely other PHP applications to compromise Web servers.

    The buffer overflow vulnerability, dubbed Ghost, was reported Tuesday by researchers from security vendor Qualys. It is identified as CVE-2015-0235 in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures database.

    The bug is located in the gethostbyname*() functions of the glibc (GNU C Library) version 2.17 and older. It was fixed in glibc-2.18, released in May 2013, but it wasn't flagged as a security vulnerability at the time.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Apple puts the big hurt on Samsung

    Things are not looking so good for Samsung in the smartphone market, especially as it faces its Apple nemesis.

    Long the world's largest smartphone maker, Samsung is likely to see Apple iPhones rise to the top spot in 2015, pushing Samsung and its Galaxy and other smartphone models into second place.

    What's more, Apple is releasing in April its first Apple Watch, which could knock the wind out of smartwatch competitors including Samsung, which already has several models on the market.

    "No question, 2015 is going to be a challenging year for Samsung," said IDC analyst Ryan Reith.

    There are many reasons for Samsung's decline and not all of them have to do with Apple's product superiority. What Samsung must do to reverse its declining share in smartphones and remain a competitor against Apple in smartwatches may sound like a complex marketing dilemma, but a lot comes down to Samsung's basic need to build a better overall brand reputation.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • FCC redefines 'broadband' -- to HOWLS of rage from ISPs and GOP

    How fast is 'advanced' broadband? Would it surprise you to learn that it's 4 Mbps? That's how the FCC classified the benchmark in 2010 (4 up, 1 down). But now, the Commission has revised it to 25 Mbps (and 3 up).

    Cue: much wailing and gnashing of teeth from cable and fiber ISPs (and Republicans).

    In the past, this column has been critical of Tom Wheeler's FCC for not promoting much-needed competition. However, this looks like a strategic move to do just that. Which is encouraging. In IT Blogwatch, bloggers feel the need -- the need for speed.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • But we just got him broken in!

    This 20-years-at-the-same-company pilot fish's specialty is writing interface screens for customers, and he regularly works with a co-worker at another site whose specialty is designing reports for the screens fish designs.

    "Because we have worked together for so long, each of us is often signed up for the other's projects and our manager bills our time against the project's account," says fish.

    "A while back we were assigned to a project run by a newly hired project manager who was in our European offices. This project manager was extremely over-zealous. First he scheduled daily one-hour conference calls in the afternoon to discuss his project. Then he added daily one-hour conference calls each morning.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 7 cool tools for doing devops right
    7 cool tools for doing devops right
    IT News

    Image by iStockphoto

    Once upon a time, developers and operations were often at each other’s throats. Production code was never updated quickly enough for developers’ liking, and administrators in charge of keeping the servers running smoothly chafed at developers’ hasty insistence on shortcutting processes and piling up serve requests.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • How three small credit card transactions could reveal your identity

    Just three small clues -- receipts for a pizza, a coffee and a pair of jeans -- are enough information to identify a person's credit card transactions from among those of a million people, according to a new study.

    The findings, published in the journal Science, add to other research showing that seemingly anonymous data sets may not protect people's privacy under rigorous analysis.

    "The fact that a few data points are enough to uniquely identify an individual was true in credit card metadata," said Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, an MIT graduate student and one of the study's authors.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • At UCSF Medical Center, robot-aided healthcare is here

    When the brand-new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay in San Francisco opens on Sunday, patients will be greeted by staffers that more strongly resemble R2-D2 than the cast of Scrubs

    Twenty-five Aethon "Tug" robots, comprising the largest fleet of free-roaming hospital robots in the world, will haul blood samples, food, medication, biohazardous waste and other materials and supplies around the huge, horizontal facility (about as big as three football fields). The Tugs are designed to reduce workplace injuries among hospital staff even as they let caregivers focus on, well, giving care.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Reddit handed over user info for 58% of government requests

    Reddit today released what it called its first "transparency report," which details requests for user information from both government entities and private lawyers.

    The site, which allows users to post news, photos, videos and opinions, said that in 2014, it received 55 requests for user information, including account registration data, log data and content uploaded by users from outside parties.

    Reddit agreed to hand over information for 58% of all government and civil requests, and 64% of all US state and federal government requests.

    IT News Reddit

    Requests for user information.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Citrix to cut 900 jobs as a 'defensive' move

    Citrix Systems announced better than expected financial results for the last quarter but also a restructuring plan that will see 900 jobs being cut.

    The restructuring, which includes the elimination of 700 full-time and 200 contractor positions, is expected to deliver savings of $90 million to $100 million per year, Citrix said.

    Investors seemed to cheer the news, which came out late Wednesday. Citrix's stock rose as high as $63.27 per share on Thursday, or 7 percent over the previous day's close.

    "I think Citrix's plans qualify as what might be called defensive layoffs," said Charles King, principal analyst with Pund-IT.

    The results beat analyst expectations, "but only barely," King noted.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Google misses with Q4 sales and earnings

    Google disappointed Wall Street with its fourth quarter results, missing expectations for both sales and earnings, and growing its advertising business more slowly.

    Total revenue for the period ended Dec. 31 was $18.1 billion, up 15 percent from the same period in 2013, Google reported Thursday. But after subtracting traffic acquisition costs, which is the portion of revenue shared with Google's partners, the company reported sales of $14.48 billion, well below analysts' consensus expectation of $14.61 billion, as polled by the Thomson Financial Network.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Amazon returns to profit as holiday sales soar

    The holiday season proved to be a good one for Amazon, which reported a jump in sales for the last quarter and a return to profit.

    Sales jumped 15 percent from a year earlier and Amazon reported a profit after two straight quarters of losses. It's earnings blew past expectations, causing its stock to jump more than 14 percent in after-hours trading.

    Amazon also revealed that it will break out its revenue from Amazon Web Services in its next earnings report, something it hasn't done in the past.

    The news Thursday wasn't all good. Net income for the quarter, which ended Dec. 31, declined 11 percent from a year earlier, to $214 million. But its earnings of $0.45 per share were much higher than the $0.18 analysts had been expecting, according to Thomson Reuters.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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