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Professional Websites at Affordable Prices - Cyberminds Ltd
Who we are?

We are a London based website design and development company.
We design, develop, deploy, host and maintain websites for our clients. Other services include Website and Email Hosting
A professionally designed website is memorable, intuitive and easy to use. Don’t let inexperienced people decide the faith of your business.
Our extensive experience expands in areas ranging from logo and web design, email marketing, e-commerce etc...
We believe that every business is unique and has its own specific needs which should be individually addressed. Stop wondering what to do next and let your business dream come true by calling us on +44(0)2033686958. Or simply send us a message by email and one of our consultants will call you back to discuss your needs. Consultation is absolutely free.

Our Services & Prices
Basic Website With Two Pages - £99
  • 2 website Pages
  • 1 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 Domain name
  • 1 year hosting
  • 2 email addresses
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 2 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Business Website Simple Package -
Was £350 Now £297.50
  • Up to 8 website Pages
  • 1 Domain name
  • 2 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses
  • Content Management System
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 6 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Simple Package -
Was £850 Now £722.50
  • Up to 10 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • logo design
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 250 MB (upgradable)
  • SSL (Shared)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 2 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Full Package -
Was £1250 Now £1062.50
  • Up to 20 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • 2 logo design
  • 1,5 year hosting
  • Up to 7 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 500 MB (upgradable)
  • 1 year SSL Certificate (dedicated)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 3 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Work we have done in the past
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What our clients say
  •   Cyberminds Ltd Have provided us with a great application that enables us to filter job applicant CVs on the fly. We are delighted as the nightmare of manually going through hundreds of CV is over. I am also impressed by the level and quality of support we received from them as we never wondered one day what to do while working with this company. .

    John Price      18/08/2010
  •   I was looking for an e-commerce website and Cyberminds have given me more than an online business. Our web site works fine and we have never had any major problem with it. The price was really good. I proudly recommend this company to anyone in need of a website. .

    Rachel Jones      4/3/2011
  •   I take this chance to thank Cyberminds for the work that has been done for my company. They have created an awesome website for me with a beautiful design. the contract was respected, they finished the job on time and the price was very attractive. I really recommend this company to anyone who needs a serious website. Thank you for your service! .

    Lord Fulama      15/7/2011
  •   As an estate agent manager, we have worked with many companies but Cyberminds Ltd have really impressed us as we soon realised that they didn't just come to us to dump a piece of software and get their money. They offered us a real business solution and were very nice people to work with. I wish many people have this lovely experience. .

    Andrew Craig      03/09/2011
 
IT News (Read all)
  • Now that A.I. has mastered 'Go,' are all our jobs next?

    There was once a time when no one thought computers could master chess; then, in 1997, IBM's Deep Blue beat chess champion Garry Kasparov. The bar then moved to the ancient Chinese game of Go -- until Europe's reigning human champion fell to Google's AlphaGo system late last year.

    One by one, artificial intelligence has overcome the obstacles set before it. Is this all part of an inevitable trend leading to humanity's obsolescence -- or, at least, unemployment?

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • As noncompete agreement use expands, backlash grows

    Noncompete agreements are becoming boilerplate in employment contracts, and for employees, there's nothing good about them. They create enormous uncertainty about future job options and worry about launching a new business.

    Their use is spurring legislative fights in leading tech-industry states.

    Employers see noncompete agreements as a "low-cost measure to bind their workforce," said Massachusetts State Rep. Lori Ehrlich (D-Essex), in an interview. She has been trying to get noncompetes banned in that state for years.

    The use of noncompete agreements may be increasingly common.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Fusion, not fiction

    Dick Tracy used a two-way wristwatch to communicate; smartwatches have been available to the masses for years now. Star Trek replicators were used to create both objects and food on demand, a role that 3D printers are now starting to fill.

    Life imitating fiction is hardly new. 

    But technologists and scientists keep taking this to the next level, bringing technologies that were previously only imagined ever closer to reality. And now researchers are working on creating Iron Man’s ARC fusion reactor.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Mozilla sets kill date for Firefox OS on phones
    IT News
  • BrandPost: How Big Data, Cloud and Wearables are Impacting Super Bowl 50

    In just a few days, the annual data-fest that is commonly known as Super Bowl 50 will begin when the Carolina Panthers take on the Denver Broncos here in San Francisco. Far be it for me to pick a winner (if I must, the Panthers), but this year’s game will feature some exciting wearable technology for the first time.

    Since 2013, the National Football League (NFL) has partnered with Zebra Technologies to roll out radio frequency identification, or RFID, technology to track NFL players during games. The 2015 season saw widespread use in every game and this year we’ll see it adopted in the Super Bowl. Zebra has outfitted each player with a tiny RFID sensor on each shoulder pad and placed 20 receivers around the stadium to collect data on how each player moves. They’ll be tracking metrics, such as acceleration, velocity, direction and distance traveled, in near real-time.  

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with new Raspberry Pi 2 rival

    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel's Odroid-C2 computer.

    The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

    The popularity of single-board computers has grown with more people developing robots, wearables, drones and other devices. Few boards have been designed to be desktop replacements, and the that are powerful enough, like Nvidia's Jetson and Rockchip-backed Firefly, are priced over $200.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Samsung display on truck's rear lets vehicles behind see road ahead

    Samsung this week officially launched its first prototype of a semi-trailer truck with a large, high-definition display on the back so vehicles behind can see the road ahead, even at night.

    The technology was deployed as a way to make single-lane highways or roads safer by allowing vehicles following trucks to know when it's safe to pass.

    The Samsung Safety Truck uses two built-in front-facing cameras and a specially designed transportation software platform to capture and transmit a picture of the road ahead.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Review: The Huawei Honor 5X -- a lot for a low price

    Not everyone drives a Lexus. Lots of people drive less luxurious cars such as a Kia Sportage and are very happy to do so. Along the same lines, not everyone wants/needs/can afford the iPhone 6S Plus or the HTC One M9. Something less expensive that handles the basics will do just fine. And if it does a little more than that? Well, even better.

    That's where the Huawei Honor 5X fits in. It's a slightly underpowered large-format unlocked Android phone that carries some surprisingly sophisticated features for its $200 price tag.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Microsoft tries to make the Bing app for iOS and Android much more useful

    What do people even use their smartphones for these days?

    There’s the obvious -- making calls, texting, finding an Uber, and thumbing through Facebook feeds. After those activities, we almost always turn to search functions. Rather laboriously, we tap a movie theater name and city or we try to look up gas prices. It’s a portal to what is around us in the moment, but it’s cumbersome because we have to type so much text.

    Just this week, Microsoft made a valiant attempt to improve how search works on your mobile by cutting out a few extra steps. A good example of this is related to food. On a smartphone, if you are not using it to text and call, you are likely trying to find a place to eat. In the new version, there is now a tab called Deals, which pops up coupons for places like Subway and Domino’s. It also shows deals for haircut places, Red Box, and even a truck rental. It removes some of the frustration.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Microsoft uses the force: You WILL upgrade to Windows 10

    I like Windows 10, but I prefer Windows 7. Is that a sin?

    Microsoft thinks so.

    Microsoft Chief Marketing Officer Chris Capossela recently said that if you choose to keep using Windows 7, you do so “at your own risk, at your own peril.”

    Why? Because “We worry, when people are running an operating system that’s 10 years old, that the next printer they buy isn’t going to work well, or they buy a new game, they buy Fallout 4, a very popular game, and it doesn’t work on a bunch of older machines,” Capossela stated. “And so, as we are pushing our ISV [independent software vendor] and hardware partners to build great new stuff that takes advantage of Windows 10 that obviously makes the old stuff really bad and not to mention viruses and security problems.”

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Making shoppers happy for the right reasons

    While browsing analyst reports this week, new research from Accenture caught my attention. It chastised retailers for “failing to meet consumer demand for increased convenience while shopping with mobile devices.”

    The core of the report makes a fair, albeit blindingly obvious: point that a lot of retailers are not sufficiently upgrading their mobile apps and websites to support current mobile devices.

    Among the referenced deficiencies: “Only seven percent of retailers said they currently have the ability to send real-time promotions. Furthermore, while nearly one-third (32 percent) of shoppers want to be able to scan products in-store using their mobile devices — up from 27 percent in 2014 — only 17 percent of retailers provide scanning capabilities. At the same time, 42 percent of shoppers want to receive automatic credit for coupons and discounts via their mobile phones — up from 35 percent last year — yet only 16 percent of retailers have the capability to automatically credit coupons.”

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Firefox OS for smartphones has ceased to be, says Mozilla (and Tardigrade)

    Mozilla Firefox OS has expired: Bereft of life, it rests in peas—we think that’s how Mozilla Corp’s “Global Marketing Director” for Firefox OS sees it it. John Bernard (Marketer of the Year, 2013) and sidekick George Roter tell us about their “substantial decisions,” which includes giving up on beating iOS and Android.

    But give them some credit: They were certainly “clear and direct,” as promised. The statement wasn't veiled in the usual, spin-doctored, PR-speak.

    In IT Blogwatch, bloggers get what they deserve. Not to mention: Tardigrades...

    curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Assessing the U.S. power grid after Ukraine

    It finally happened. The power grid went down, affecting hundreds of thousands of people, and the cause was at least in part computer malware. Some people had been warning about this for years.

    Maybe you didn’t hear about it. The outage occurred in Ukraine, after all. But even though the incident didn’t get a lot of attention here, it’s still significant. And now that I’ve called your attention to it, you might be wondering how this could have happened. Aren’t our power grids “air gapped” from the Internet? Well, not exactly.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Dridex malware now distributes antivirus program

    Users tricked by spam messages to open malicious Word documents that distribute the Dridex online banking Trojan might have a pleasant surprise: They'll get a free anitivirus program instead.

    That's because an unknown person -- possibly a white-hat hacker -- gained access to some of the servers that cybercriminals use to distribute the Dridex Trojan and replaced the malware with an installer for Avira Free Antivirus.

    Dridex is one of the three most widely used computer Trojans that target online banking users. Last year, law enforcement authorities from the U.S. and U.K. attempted to disrupt the botnet and indicted a man from Moldova who is believed to be responsible for some of the attacks.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 6 Apple services Tim Cook could bring to Android

    Apple has even bigger plans for Android, Apple CEO, Tim Cook, hinted in a Town Hall meeting with employees last night, so what services might it bring to Android in future? Here’s a few suggestions:

    Town hall speak

    Apple already offers Apple Music for Android, Cook explained that Apple Music for Android isn’t just about the music, but is also a way for the company to test the potential of bringing its services to other platforms.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Fed up with bogus computer support calls, man turns tables on scammers

    Seth was weary of the calls from bogus Windows support technicians, and decided to, if not get even, at least give them a taste of their own medicine.

    "I was really tired [of the calls], and I really hate computer scammers," said Seth, whose last name Computerworld withheld for privacy reasons. "I got fed up."

    Like millions of others, Seth had been on the receiving end of scammers' phone calls, who rang up and told him that they were with "Microsoft support" or "Windows support," then proceeded to claim that they had detected malware on his machine.

    "I would get these calls three or four times a year," said Seth in an interview, adding that the calls would continue for a week or more, then end, only to resume months later. He would hang up on the callers or tell them he had no computer or was running a Mac.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Microsoft at MWC: Will anyone care?

    Let me be upfront for those who think this analysis may be biased (and who think about sending me hate mail). I am not anti-Microsoft. But I have to call things as I see them. And let's be honest -- Microsoft's effort in the phone space is a disaster (although it is doing good things in the Surface product lines).

    It never should have bought Nokia's phone unit to begin with (thank Stephen Elop's influence on Ballmer for that mistake). Shutting it down was a smart move by Satya Nadella (and the majority of his decisions so far have impressed me). But continuing to invest in the phone side in either hardware or OS makes no sense, even with Microsoft's impressive resources.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Review: 2 low-cost Windows 10 laptops challenge the Chromebooks

    Call it the democratization of technology, but $200 buys an awful lot of notebook today. The staying power of the Chromebook has shown that lightweight, low-cost technology has a place in today's marketplace -- and, perhaps in answer to that, several low-cost Windows 10 laptops have recently hit the market. They appeal to a variety of audiences, from students in need of an inexpensive school PC to business travelers looking for a lightweight second computer for the road.

    And they have one advantage over Chromebooks: Because they run Windows 10, they can use a wide variety of familiar software. In fact, each of these "Blue Light Specials" comes with a year's subscription to Office 365 Personal and a terabyte of online storage that's worth $70.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Because the user is always right, right?

    This company manages an automated teller machine network -- controlling the ATMs and moving money between banks -- and is upgrading its billing system, according to a pilot fish who's working on the project.

    And the new features aren't exactly simple. "The new release would allow a rolled-up integer count of items to be charged, integrated with the various pricing schemes including tiered pricing, parent pricing, and child-pays-full-price-while-parent-gets-discount pricing," fish says.

    Fortunately, the team is well into the testing stage and the worst of the complications are past.

    At least that's what fish thinks, until the lead user in the billing department tells fish his people have come up with a new idea: That item count could also be used as a money field -- dollars and cents -- to report the total transaction value.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • UN panel backs WikiLeaks' Assange, but he still may not go free

    A UN panel has ruled that the time Julian Assange has spent cooped up in the London embassy of the Ecuador government amounts to arbitrary detention by the U.K. and Sweden, but it is unlikely that the founder of the WikiLeaks whistle-blowing website will walk away free soon.

    The U.K. government has reportedly said that the decision of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention is not binding on it, while there is a warrant against Assange. It did not change its earlier stance that it would arrest Assange for his extradition to Sweden as soon as he leaves the Ecuador embassy, where he has been living since 2012. Shortly after the panel announced its opinion, the U.K. said it would formally contest it.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Edward Yourdon remembered for 'great wisdom about everything IT'

    There’s a good chance you have read something by Edward Yourdon, especially if you were interested in emerging IT problems and trends.

    Yourdon, who died Jan. 20 of complications from a blood infection, was a computer consultant and an expert on software engineering principles. He was noted, in particular, for his work on structured programming methodologies and authored or co-authored more than two dozen books, hundreds of technical articles and many columns for Computerworld.

    Inducted into the Computer Hall of Fame in 1997, he was 71.

    Yourdon’s interests and impacts were wide-ranging. Notably, at a time when few even thought about offshore outsourcing and the movement of programming jobs overseas, Yourdon’s 1993 book, The Decline and Fall of the American Programmer, offered an early warning about how such a job shift might happen.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 7 smartphone trends to watch for this year

    Smartphones this year are poised to become more interactive, more fun and maybe a little bit smarter than you’d like them to be.

    On the high end, smartphones will get into virtual reality, PC docking and 4K home entertainment. Low-cost phones will offer more bang for the buck with higher-resolution screens, better graphics and faster wireless communications.

    Virtual and augmented reality

    Smartphones can already be used to roam virtual worlds, such as with the Google Cardboard holder that enables stereoscopic viewing, or connected to a VR headset like Samsung's Gear VR. But the experience will get better this year with Lenovo and Google's Project Tango handset, which will provide a wealth of data on a user's location and objects in view, with information overlaid on the screen. Sensors will be able to measure distances and, like Microsoft's Kinect, track movement and gestures. By mapping surroundings, a smartphone will also be able to direct an employee to a specific meeting room. The companies see the Tango phone being used in engineering and medical applications. For fun, it will let you play augmented reality games with the physical world as the background. The Project Tango smartphone will ship by the middle of this year, and it'll be priced under $650. For developers, Intel will have a Tango-compatible smartphone with software development kits and a 3D camera for $399.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • What businesses should know about Privacy Shield

    U.S. businesses may take some comfort from the fact that a successor to the Safe Harbor agreement has finally been named, but at this point, they shouldn't get too comfortable.

    Since it was first announced on Tuesday, the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield agreement governing trans-Atlantic data transfers has elicited considerable concern, not least because it remains largely unwritten and unclear. Privacy watchdogs in Europe have cautioned that it can't be relied upon for legal protection for several months; some say it won't be enough even then.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Box helps businesses better control encryption of cloud data

    Box has made it easier for its customers to control how stored data is encrypted with an update announced Thursday.

    The company announced a new service called Box KeySafe, which allows companies to control the keys used to encrypt data stored in Box. It comes in two flavors: a KeySafe with AWS Key Management Service that's designed to be easy for small companies to handle and not require a lot of time, and KeySafe with AWS CloudHSM, which uses hardware modules to manage keys via Amazon's product and is the latest revision of what was previously the Enterprise Key Management service.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Edge's weak adoption contributes to Microsoft's declining browser share

    The failure of Microsoft's Edge to attract users of the new Windows 10 operating system has contributed to the company's overall decline in browser share, analysis of recently-published data shows.

    According to several metrics sources, Edge's share of the global Windows 10 user base was significantly lower in January than was Internet Explorer's (IE) share of all Windows users, signaling that Microsoft has not been able to maintain the historical -- or even current -- percentages of Windows customers on its newest browser.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • FAA bans drones from 32 miles around the Super Bowl

    If San Francisco Bay Area residents don't want to watch the Super Bowl on Sunday, they can forget about flying their drones.

    The Federal Aviation Administration has banned all drones from flying anywhere within a 32-mile radius of Levi's Stadium as part of a complex and strict set of rules for all air traffic. That's an area that includes all of Silicon Valley, San Jose, Oakland and most of San Francisco.

    Drones, model aircraft, model rockets, hang gliding, crop dusting and parachuting are among the aviation activities banned from 2 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. on Sunday. The game coverage begins at 5 p.m. ET.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IBM doubles down on data with four new cloud tools

    Data is what makes today's business world go 'round, and IBM on Thursday launched a suite of new tools designed to help companies make the most of what they've got.

    Targeting developers and data scientists, the four new offerings are part of IBM's Cloud Data Services portfolio.

    First, IBM Graph is a fully managed graph database service built on the open-source Apache TinkerPop graph-computing framework. Developers can use it to extend apps with real-time recommendations, fraud detection, or IoT and network-analysis features.

    An e-retailer, for example, could use the tool to suggest compelling purchase pairings to its customers.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • A.I. and virtual reality may propel future of retail (+video)

    As retailers look ahead to the way consumers will shop in the next five to 10 years, it's likely they'll be using technologies like artificial intelligence and virtual reality to keep customers interested.

    Retail is no longer about having the latest products on the shelves in brick-and-mortar stores or having a cool website. It's becoming much more than that.

    Some retailers already are working to merge their in-store and online efforts, which provides more information about their customers, allows better customer service and the chance to sell more goods.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • IDG Contributor Network: Cue the surprise: Oracle suggests Amazon's cloud isn't real

    Over at Fortune, Barb Darrow detailed a conversation the magazine had with Oracle's vice president of cloud development, Peter Magnusson. The upshot of the conversation was that, in Magnusson's (and, one assumes, Oracle's) opinion, Amazon Web Services (AWS) does not define enterprise cloud computing. At first glance, it would be easy to discount Magnusson's comments as the sort of cloud washing that we've come to expect, over the past decade or so, from the old guard of enterprise IT. Companies like SAP, IBM, Oracle and HP tend to dismiss anything new and potentially threatening as "not enterprise-grade."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Serious flaws discovered in Netgear's NMS300 network management system

    Serious vulnerabilities in the Netgear NMS300 ProSafe network management system, an application used to discover, monitor and configure a wide range of network devices, can allow hackers to take control of the servers it's running on.

    The NMS300 can be installed on Windows XP, 7, 8, 10, as well as Windows Server 2003, 2008 and 2012. It allows network administrators to centrally manage network switches, routers, wireless access points, printers, network-attached storage systems, firewall appliances and other devices that support SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol).

    The software is free for managing up to 200 devices and provides an easy-to-use Web graphical interface that can be accessed remotely.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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