Professional websites at affordable prices.

 +44(0)2033686958
Professional Websites at Affordable Prices - Cyberminds Ltd
Who we are?

We are a London based website design and development company.
We design, develop, deploy, host and maintain websites for our clients. Other services include Website and Email Hosting
A professionally designed website is memorable, intuitive and easy to use. Don’t let inexperienced people decide the faith of your business.
Our extensive experience expands in areas ranging from logo and web design, email marketing, e-commerce etc...
We believe that every business is unique and has its own specific needs which should be individually addressed. Stop wondering what to do next and let your business dream come true by calling us on +44(0)2033686958. Or simply send us a message by email and one of our consultants will call you back to discuss your needs. Consultation is absolutely free.

Our Services & Prices
Basic Website With Two Pages - £99
  • 2 website Pages
  • 1 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 Domain name
  • 1 year hosting
  • 2 email addresses
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 2 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Business Website Simple Package -
Was £350 Now £297.50
  • Up to 8 website Pages
  • 1 Domain name
  • 2 Stock Photo of your choice
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses
  • Content Management System
  • Money Back Guarantee
  • Possible Duration: 6 days
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Simple Package -
Was £850 Now £722.50
  • Up to 10 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • logo design
  • 1 year hosting
  • 5 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 250 MB (upgradable)
  • SSL (Shared)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 2 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
E-Commerce Website Full Package -
Was £1250 Now £1062.50
  • Up to 20 website Pages
  • Domain name
  • 2 logo design
  • 1,5 year hosting
  • Up to 7 email addresses (Professional)
  • database 500 MB (upgradable)
  • 1 year SSL Certificate (dedicated)
  • Content Management/Admin (used to upload product and manage website)
  • Money Back Guarantee (View Terms)
  • Possible Duration: 3 weeks
  • Submission to free search engines
  • Full Details... |  
Work we have done in the past
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What our clients say
  •   Cyberminds Ltd Have provided us with a great application that enables us to filter job applicant CVs on the fly. We are delighted as the nightmare of manually going through hundreds of CV is over. I am also impressed by the level and quality of support we received from them as we never wondered one day what to do while working with this company. .

    John Price      18/08/2010
  •   I was looking for an e-commerce website and Cyberminds have given me more than an online business. Our web site works fine and we have never had any major problem with it. The price was really good. I proudly recommend this company to anyone in need of a website. .

    Rachel Jones      4/3/2011
  •   I take this chance to thank Cyberminds for the work that has been done for my company. They have created an awesome website for me with a beautiful design. the contract was respected, they finished the job on time and the price was very attractive. I really recommend this company to anyone who needs a serious website. Thank you for your service! .

    Lord Fulama      15/7/2011
  •   As an estate agent manager, we have worked with many companies but Cyberminds Ltd have really impressed us as we soon realised that they didn't just come to us to dump a piece of software and get their money. They offered us a real business solution and were very nice people to work with. I wish many people have this lovely experience. .

    Andrew Craig      03/09/2011
 
IT News (Read all)
  • Apple hands 8 execs stock awards worth up to $27M

    Apple recently awarded eight executives stock grants that were worth almost $13 million each at Thursday's closing price, with as much as another $14 million up for grabs.

    The stock grants came in two parts. The first was an award of 122,863 shares that vest over a three-year stretch, starting in April 2017 and will be given if an executive is still with the company. The second, totalling 68,576 shares, will vest in October 2017, with the exact number based on Apple's performance relative to the S&P 500 index.

    Most of Apple's top management team was handed the stock awards on Oct. 17. They included Angela Ahrendts, the former Burberry CEO who heads retail and online sales; Eddy Cue, the online and services chief; Craig Federighi, the lead for software engineering; CFO Luca Maestri; Daniel Riccio, vice president of hardware engineering; marketing lead Philip Schiller; Apple's top lawyer, Bruce Sewell; and COO Jeffrey Williams.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 5 great iPhone, iPad accessories for busy people

    I've identified some cool accessories I think will be useful for people wanting to get the best from their iPhone or iPad while on the move.

    Livescribe 3 Smartpen and Moleskine notebook

    Livescribe is the best way I've found to sketch and take notes using iOS. It's a real pen that writes real ink on a real Livescribe notebook -- which also communicates what you write or draw to an app on your iOS device, creating an instant and immediate digital copy that can be archived, edited and shared. The Moleskine notebook (c.$16)just adds a touch of rather nice luxury. I really like these things and find them invaluable when sketching art ideas for various projects -- and set-up and reliability are a breeze, as you'd expect from a premium product of this kind. If you simply want to input notes into your iPad you might also try Wacom's Bamboo series of styluses and iOS apps. (Livescribe, from $149; Wacom Bamboo stylus from c.$30)

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Backoff malware linked to data breaches is spreading

    The number of computers in North America infected by the Backoff malware, which is blamed for a string of payment card breaches, has risen sharply, according to research from network security company Damballa.

    The company detected a 57 percent increase between August and September in devices infected with Backoff, which scrapes a computer's RAM for leftover credit card data after a payment card has been swiped, said Brian Foster, Damballa's CTO.

    Damballa based its finding on data it collects from its ISP and enterprise customers, who use its traffic analysis products to detect malicious activity.

    Damballa sees about 55 percent of internet traffic from North America, including DNS requests, though for privacy reasons it doesn't know the IP addresses of most of those computers, Foster said.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • China develops its own homegrown servers amid cybersecurity concerns

    A Chinese company has developed the country's first homegrown servers, built entirely out of domestic technologies including a processor from local chip maker Loongson Technology.

    China's Dawning Information Industry, also known as Sugon, has developed a series of four servers using the Loongson 3B processor, the country's state-run Xinhua News Agency reported Thursday.

    "Servers are crucial applications in a country's politics, economy, and information security. We must fully master all these technologies," Dawning's vice president Sha Chaoqun was quoted as saying.

    The servers, including their operating systems, have all been developed from Chinese technology. The Loongson 3B processor inside them has eight cores made with a total of 1.1 billion transistors built using a 28-nanometer production process.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Toshiba Chromebook 2 review: An attractive Chrome OS experience

    At first, if you wanted a Chrome OS laptop, your choices were to either pay $1,300 for a top-of-the-line experience or to suffer with a poky and poorly built product in the $200 to $400 range.

    The introduction of Intel's Haswell-based processors in 2013 fixed part of the problem, giving us affordable Chromebooks with plenty of power -- devices like Acer's C720 Chromebook and Dell's Chromebook 11. Then this year's Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 11e Chromebook brought in the first midrange option, with a never-before-seen level of build quality, display quality and versatility -- and a price just under $500.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Automation arrives at restaurants (but don’t blame rising minimum wages)

    McDonald's this week told financial analysts of its plans to install self-ordering kiosks and mobile ordering at its restaurants. It isn't the only food chain doing this.

    The company that owns Chili's Grill & Bar also said this week it will complete a tablet ordering system rollout next month at its U.S. restaurants. Applebee's announced last December that it would deliver tablets to 1,800 restaurants this year.

    The pace of self-ordering system deployments appears to be gaining speed. But there's a political element to this and it's best to address it quickly.

    The move toward more automation comes at the same time pressure to raise minimum wages is growing. A Wall Street Journal editorial this week, "Minimum Wage Backfire," said that while it may be true for McDonald's to say that its tech plans will improve customer experience, the move is also "a convenient way...to justify a reduction in the chain's global workforce."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Cyberespionage group goes phishing for Outlook Web App users

    A cyberespionage group has been using advanced spear-phishing techniques to steal email log-in credentials from the employees of military agencies, embassies, defense contractors and international media outlets that use Office 365's Outlook Web App.

    The group behind the attack campaign has been operating since at least 2007 according to researchers from Trend Micro, who published a research paper on Wednesday about the attacks they dubbed Operation Pawn Storm.

    The Pawn Storm attackers have used a variety of techniques over the years to compromise their targets, including spear-phishing emails with malicious Microsoft Office attachments that installed a backdoor-type malware program called SEDNIT or Sofacy, or selective exploits injected into compromised legitimate websites.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Because what could possibly go wrong?

    Pilot fish is dispatched to a big, highly automated warehouse to install a new server.

    "It was a really cool facility," fish says. "The computer room had a second-floor glass wall, looking into the warehouse. There were robotic forklifts running on wire guides in the floor. The orders came in, the robots picked and delivered product to the packing area."

    Everything is going fine with the server install when suddenly the lights blink and the UPS takes over.

    Fish's first thought: What did I do?

    Nothing, it turns out -- a backhoe nearby has just ripped through the main power feed for the warehouse. Once the much relieved fish learns that, he returns to the install and finishes up in well under an hour.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Microsoft to use Nokia brand for entry-level phones

    Microsoft will continue to sell low-end phones with the Nokia brand and has licensed the brand for these type of devices.

    The company is meanwhile preparing to roll out its new Microsoft Lumia brand, Tuula Rytilä, senior vice president of marketing for phones at Microsoft, said in an interview posted late Thursday on the Conversations blog, which will also move to the Microsoft website.

    "Our global and local websites are going through a transition as we speak and in the coming days our social channels will get a new name too -- they will be called Microsoft Lumia," Rytilä said. "This work continues across our devices, packaging and retail, to name a few."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Update: Microsoft Q1 sales jump, but Nokia drags down earnings

    Microsoft revenue leaped 25 percent in the first quarter but profit dropped, dragged down by expenses tied to its ongoing wave of layoffs and to the integration of Nokia's phone business.

    Revenue hit $23.2 billion in the quarter ended Sept. 30, easily exceeding the $22 billion consensus expectation from analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

    Meanwhile, net income was $4.54 billion, or $0.54 per share. That exceeded analysts' expectations by $0.05, but represented a drop of 13 percent in earnings per share compared with last year's first quarter.

    Profit was hurt by $1.14 billion of integration and restructuring expenses, which had a negative impact equivalent to $0.11 per share, resulting from the massive round of layoffs the company began to carry out in July and from the ongoing meshing of the Nokia Devices and Services business, whose $7.2 billion acquisition closed in April.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Update: Amazon builds sales, but quarterly losses pile up

    Amazon.com continued to increase its sales last quarter but losses also mounted, to the growing consternation of investors.

    Amazon's overall sales were up 20 percent in the third quarter, amounting to $20.58 billion for the three months ended Sept. 30, the company said Thursday.

    At the same time, however, Amazon's losses reached $437 million, compared to a loss of $41 million in the same period last year.

    That led investors to push its share price lower. Amazon's shares were selling for $279  at the time of this report, down 11 percent from the close of regular trading.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Apple Pay's next move: phone-to-phone payments?

    The launch this week of Apple Pay is giving many people their first taste of NFC payment technology, which allows them to buy things in a store by bringing an iPhone 6 close to a compatible terminal.

    But the NFC standard also allows payments to be made directly between smartphones. Apple and its competitors, such as Google Wallet, don't offer support for that part of the standard, but the technology already exists inside many of today's NFC-equipped phones and could one day allow retailers to accept NFC payment using smartphones. It would also be technically possible for individuals to exchange money with their friends through the same system.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Oracle says Oregon wanted to take 'unacceptable risk' with healthcare website

    The blame game between Oracle and the state of Oregon is going into overtime, even before their dueling lawsuits over the disastrous Cover Oregon health insurance exchange website make it into court.

    Cover Oregon went live on Oct. 1, 2013, and like the federal Healthcare.gov site that's a centerpiece of President Barack Obama's health care reform legislation, immediately ran into major performance problems. Unlike Healthcare.gov, Cover Oregon never reached full functionality.

    Both sides have flung lawsuits at one another, with Oracle seeking millions in unpaid fees and the state hoping to claw back whatever taxpayer money it can from the company.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Facebook, Yahoo prevent use of recycled email addresses to hijack accounts

    Facebook and Yahoo have developed a mechanism to prevent the owners of recycled email addresses from hijacking accounts that were registered on other sites using those addresses in the past.

    Last year, Yahoo announced a policy that involves deleting inactive email accounts and making their IDs available again for registration. Microsoft has been doing the same with Outlook.com accounts.

    The practice of recycling email addresses has been criticized by security and privacy experts because it opens the door to abuse. Attackers could register deleted addresses and take over accounts on third-party sites that use them for confirming password change requests. In addition, the recycled addresses might continue to receive messages containing sensitive information that is destined for their previous owners.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • One missed email and Google Inbox will be in trouble

    People may feel overwhelmed by the deluge of email arriving in their inboxes, but will they trust Google to show them the most important messages?

    Analysts are divided on how well Google can sort and prioritize users' emails as the company launches Inbox, an email application built without any reliance on the company's longstanding and popular Gmail service.

    "Users are upset about the volume of email messages they're receiving, but a lot of people might be unconvinced that Google can decide for them what's important and what's not," said Dan Olds, an analyst with The Gabriel Consulting Group. "Most people would be concerned about important emails dropping through the cracks, or even just interesting emails."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Apple and sapphire supplier strike deal to end partnership

    GT Advanced Technologies and Apple have agreed to a deal that will let GT close the Mesa, Ariz. and Salem, Mass. factories where it was producing scratch-resistant sapphire, and void the contracts it had signed with its one-time partner.

    GT, which filed to reorganize under Chapter 11 protection on Oct. 6, will exit the sapphire-making business and re-focus on manufacturing the furnaces used to grow the material.

    The Merrimack, N.H. company will cut most, but not all, ties with Apple, and the two will go their separate ways.

    However, Apple will be allowed to recover the $439 million it pre-paid to GT, the redacted settlement stated. Apple will receive a portion -- the exact amount was struck from the document -- of the sale of each sapphire-producing furnace that GT sells over the next four years. The furnaces in GT's possession include the 2,036 that were installed in the Mesa facility, which it will remove and store, then attempt to resell.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Facebook hopes to get people talking with Rooms app

    Facebook is going old school, with a stand-alone app for discussion boards aimed at letting users talk about shared interests without having to use their real names.

    The company released Rooms on Thursday, its answer to the craze around posting and sharing anonymously. People can use any name they want and don't need a Facebook account. The app contains rooms geared around various topics, all of which require an invite link to enter. Providing an email address is optional, for the purposes of having accessed rooms restored if the user deletes the app.

    The app is only available on iOS. Plans for other platforms like Android or Windows Phone were not disclosed.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Google teams with Oxford on artificial intelligence

    Google, the search company that's investing heavily in robotics, is teaming with Oxford University researchers to work on artificial intelligence.

    In January, Google bought the London-based artificial intelligence company DeepMind. Now the Google DeepMind group will work with two of Oxford's artificial intelligence (AI) research teams.

    The teams will work on image recognition and natural language understanding, according to Demis Hassabis, co-founder of DeepMind and vice president of engineering at Google, in a blog post.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • ARM speeds data flow in the cloud with new, zippy interconnects

    With smartphones and sensors putting more demand on servers and other back-end gear, chip design company ARM is introducing new interconnect technologies that will help shuttle the data around more quickly.

    The new CoreLink interconnects will be added to ARM's Cortex-A57 and Cortex-A53 processor designs, which chip makers license to build 64-bit chipsets for servers, set-top boxes and base stations for cellular networks.

    The widespread use of smartphones and tablets, combined with sensors used in the Internet of Things, means more and more bits need to moved into the data center, and between computers inside the data center, said Nandan Nadampally, vice president of marketing at the CPU Group at ARM.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Akamai sees record-setting spikes in DDoS attacks

    The size and volume of distributed denial-of-service attacks has exploded in the past year, with a 389 percent increase in average attack bandwidth between the third quarter of 2013 and the third quarter of 2014, according to an Internet security report from Akamai Technologies.

    This should make companies consider using cloud-based security services, such as the DDoS filtering technology Akamai provides, said John Summers, vice president of the company's security business unit.

    During the past quarter, Akamai defended against 17 DDoS attacks flooding targets with traffic greater than 100 Gbps, with the largest at 321 Gbps, the cloud services vendor said in its Q3 2014 State of the Internet report, released Thursday.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • 5K Retina iMac supply tightens

    Apple's 5K Retina iMac continues to slip in ship times, proof that the company's problem syncing supply and demand is getting worse, not better.

    On Thursday, the $2,499 iMac showed a five-to-seven-day business delay between ordering and shipping.

    Apple introduced the 5K Retina iMac on Oct. 16 to effusive reviews, even at a price 39% higher than the same 27-in. all-in-one sans the ultra-high-resolution display. On the day it started selling the new iMac, Apple's online store said there was a one-to-two-business-day delay before shipping. The next day that lengthened to three to five business days.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Researchers use silicon to push quantum computing toward reality

    Researchers in Australia have developed silicon-wrapped quantum technology that could solve problems that have held back the development of powerful quantum computers.

    The scientists, working on similar but separate projects at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), used silicon as a protectant shell around the bits, also known as qubits, in a quantum machine.

    By doing that, they've made the qubits, the building blocks for quantum computers, more accurate, increased the length of time they'll hold information and possible made quantum computers easier to build.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Living with the Xperia Z3v: Sony's latest smartphone deserves your attention

    Some people look at technology in terms of individual pieces: What type of processor does a new phone have? How high is its display resolution? How much power can its battery hold? 

    Me, I'm more of a big-picture kind of guy. Individual pieces are fine, but I'm far more interested in what type of overall user experience those pieces add up to create -- you know, what a device is actually like to use in the real world.

    A lot of Android phones have the right pieces on paper, after all, but fail to create a cohesive or compelling overall user experience. It isn't something that's easy to get right; there's no single spec or formula for such an abstract yet easily recognizable concept.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Wearable health devices are a novelty that wear off

    Once the novelty wears off, people abandon their health wearable devices, many of which require regular syncing, powering up and other steps needed to keep them running.

    Only 10% of 1,000 U.S. consumers surveyed who own wearables wear their devices every day, 7% wear them a few times a week and 2% wear them a few times a month.

    That was one of the key findings of a PricewaterhouseCoopers survey released this week. PwC also released a study on the future of wearables, indicating that wearable technology is the next big thing, even if it hasn't quite yet caught on.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Abandoned subdomains pose a security risk for businesses

    Many companies set up subdomains for use with external services, but then forget to disable them when they stop using those services, creating a loophole for attackers to exploit.

    Because many service providers don't properly validate the ownership of subdomains pointed at their servers, attackers can set up new accounts and abuse subdomains forgotten by companies by claiming them as their own.

    Removing or updating DNS entries for subdomains that are no longer actively used sounds like something that should be common procedure, but according to researchers from Detectify, a Stockholm-based provider of website security scanning services, this type of oversight is actually quite widespread among companies.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Nike CEO hints at 'stylish' Apple wearable plans
    IT News
  • Phone maker Xiaomi moves data outside China over privacy concerns

    Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi is moving customer data and its Internet platforms to servers outside China, only months after the company apologized over privacy concerns.

    Since early this year, Xiaomi has been migrating the data as a way to "cut down latency and reduce failure rates" for its customers across the world, said company vice president Hugo Barra in an online post on Wednesday.

    "At the same time, it also better equips us to maintain high privacy standards and comply with local data protection regulations," Barra added. "This is a very high priority for Xiaomi as we expand into new markets over the next few years."

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • What Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg said in Mandarin that so impressed the Chinese

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stunned many Chinese, not with a new Facebook feature, but because he spoke and answered questions in Mandarin for almost half an hour.

    Zuckerberg gave a talk in Chinese at Tsinghua University on Wednesday, and later posted a recording of the event to his Facebook page. The video quickly spread online, generating surprise and praise from local Internet users.

    "Such an awesome person is learning Chinese, why is my own English so bad," wrote one user on Chinese social networking site Sina Weibo.

    Zuckerberg spoke with a strong accent, but handled the language confidently enough to impress the Chinese. Increasingly, executives from the biggest tech companies in the world are visiting the country, but rarely do they speak in Mandarin, let alone for such a long period, or field questions from the audience.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • HP gives Moonshot server its first Xeon chip

    If Hewlett-Packard's Moonshot server doesn't pan out, it won't be for lack of trying.

    Its engineers have been hard at work this year adding various different CPU options for Moonshot, which uses a novel design to reduce energy and space requirements and is a big part of CEO Meg Whitman's effort to get HP back on track.

    Just last month, HP released a Moonshot system with a 64-bit ARM processor, becoming the first vendor to offer such a chip in a server. And on Thursday HP released its first Moonshot server with an Intel Xeon chip.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    IT News
  • Regulation on cloud security may spur SaaS use in health care

    Governments may need to tighten the regulatory screws on SaaS vendors to make them more transparent and forthcoming about their security practices.

    Until then, it will be hard for healthcare companies in particular to fully trust cloud software vendors, according to speakers at the EU-U.S. ehealth Marketplace and Conference in Boston on Wednesday.

    Depending on customers to audit cloud vendors to ensure that their security and privacy measures comply with U.S. government regulations on protecting sensitive data is inadequate, one of the speakers said.

    "The best we can do right now is a checklist," said Chris Davis, a Verizon senior architect whose job entails ensuring that the company's cloud services meet the data security regulations of various national governments. Technology, however, changes rapidly and checklists soon become dated, he said.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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